Andrew’s moon


Sometimes you can give children all of the instructions you want; and they will do exactly what they think you want.


I asked Andrew, to sit and hold the moon, explaining that if he holds his hands like a cup, I can take a picture looking like he is “holding the moon”. He promptly sat his little self down, crossed his legs and held up the tennis ball ~ his moon!


now, just where did I put that tripod? Could have used it here…


We even had our own fireworks last night ~ in the garden.


It was too beautiful an evening to go back into the house. Long after the animals were fed and the chicks and ducks put to bed…we lingered wandering about the pastures and fields. Sometimes you just need to eek out every second of bliss you can.


I am doggy sitting for my daughter this week, so at times I have been charged with 5 dogs…the weeds in my garden are having a field day and the plum tomatoes are waiting to be plucked off the vine; the sauerkraut is wanting to be skimmed, and the pool is now green as the grass…the pups, the llamas, the chicks, and ducks are all content…life is good.

If you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change


Si, looking out the window on a rainy day

Last year, when Naldo and Si were visiting, we had a hurricanes! You can read about it here and Here…if you ‘d like.

Be well,
Enjoy the last of the summer or whatever season it is where you live!
Jess

A colorful perception..


It’s a beautiful world!
Look around it is amazing.
Life is a colorful perception: a vision, a kiss, taste of fresh berries, childhood memories, future plans, the smell of freshly cut grass, the sound of a baby’s giggle and the touch of a loved one….

A few more pics from the Cape. What do you treasure most?
Be well.
Jess

Bountiful..or one bunch


It’s all relative isn’t it? Bounty.

This may not look like much to you…but, alas, it is this gardener’s crowning glory. Juicy purple goodness..my first grapes from this years seedling!!! Yippee.


cabbage green, tomatoes red and purple GRAPES.


Jack’s lantern…


There comes a time when autumn asks, What have you been doing all summer?


The foliage has been losing its freshness through the month of August, and here and there a yellow leaf shows
itself like the first gray hair amidst the locks of a beauty who has seen one season too many;I grow old, I grow old,’ the garden says. Thanks for the bounty, says I.

Be well,
Jess

Hope…I wish you enough.


LIFE IS HUGE! Life is not one horrible moment. It is not.
It is a glorious privilege to live, to know, to act, to listen, to behold, to love. To look up at the blue summer sky; to see the sun sink slowly beyond the line of the horizon; to watch the worlds come twinkling into view, first one by one, and the myriads that no man can count, and lo!
the universe is white with them; and you and I are here.

I wish you enough sun to keep your attitude bright.
I wish you enough rain to appreciate the sun more.
I wish you enough happiness to keep your spirit alive.
I wish you enough pain so that the smallest joys in life appear much bigger.
I wish you enough gain to satisfy your wanting.
I wish you enough loss to appreciate all that you possess.
I wish you enough hellos to get you through the final goodbye.

My prayers go out to the families of the victims of the empire state building shooting. There is no place for this in humanity.
“The colors of the rainbow so pretty in the sky
Are also on the faces of people goin’ by
I see friends shaking hands saying, “How do you do”
They’re really saying “I love you.”
I hear babies cry, I watch then grow
They’ll learn much more than I’ll ever know;
And I think to myself, What a wonderful world;
Yes, I think to myself, What a wonderful world.
Oh yeah!”
- Louis Armstrong

Be well,
Jess
PS Josh fixed my computer wows :) Love him.

awe shucks…


I may not have been posting often, but I have been thinking of you all. My computer is well ..nearly kaput…sadly until I can save enough for a replacement posting will have to be on hold. Please hang in there.
Enjoy the last of the summer months, be well,
Jess

An Award. For something I should do more of…


A very big thanks! to Faith for nominating me for the Commenter Award.

I always enjoy her inspiration, as I am sure whomever enters her blog world can attest to.

 

The guidelines:

Find your Top Recent Commenters on your site stats page on the bottom, right corner. If you do not see this, click on the Screen Options in the top, right corner and be sure that “Comments” is checked. If  you are good about responding to every comment, then you will be the first one in the list.

Pass this award on to the next six commenters on the list.

Nominate one more person who is either:

A brand new commenter on your blog,

The very last comment you have received (most recent), or

The one who has posted your most favourite comments.

The seventh nomination is your choice, so please let us know why you chose them.

Top Six Commenters!

1.Celi@ http://thekitchensgarden.wordpress.com/

2.PW @ http://prairiewisdom.wordpress.com/

3.Renee @ http://writingfeemail.wordpress.com/

4.Shannon @ http://dirtnkids.wordpress.com/

5Cara @ http://thislittlelight516.wordpress.com

6.Susan@ http://ske-daddle.com

And for number 7,  I’ll nominate a blogger whose pictures I always appreciate. Anie Z. @ http://childhoodrelived.com/   Cuz she is so stinkin funny!  I have to find more time to visit her blog….sometimes I get so busy that if it’s not right in front of me; I just don’t get there.

Thank you to anyone and everyone who has taken a precious minute out of there day to visit my little blog.  It makes me smile really, really hard.

Jess

Why do they they do it….for love.


Why do farmers farm, given their economic adversities on top of the many frustrations and difficulties normal to farming? And always the answer is: “Love. They must do it for love.” Farmers farm for the love of farming.


They love to watch and nurture the growth of plants.


They love to live in the presence of animals.


They love to work outdoors.


They love the weather, maybe even when it is making them miserable.


They love to live where they work and to work where they live.


If the scale of their farming is small enough, they like to work in the company of their children and with the help of their children. They love the measure of independence that farm life can still provide. I have an idea that a lot of farmers have gone to a lot of trouble merely to be self-employed to live at least a part of their lives without a boss.


“The first supermarket supposedly appeared on the American landscape in 1946. That is not very long ago.

Until then, where was all the food?


Dear folks, the food was in homes, gardens, local fields, and forests. It was near kitchens, near tables, near bedsides. It was in the pantry, the cellar, the backyard.” Joel Salatin, Folks, This Ain’t Normal: A Farmer’s Advice for Happier Hens, Healthier People, and a Better World.


‎A farm is a manipulative creature. There is no such thing as finished.


Work comes in a stream and has no end. There are only the things that must be done now and things that can be done later. The threat the farm has got on you, the one that keeps you running from can until can’t, is this: do it now, or some living thing will wilt or suffer or die. Its blackmail, really.

A farmer friend of mine told me recently about a busload of middle school children who came to his farm for a tour. The first two boys off the bus asked, “Where is the salsa tree?” They thought they could go pick salsa, like apples and peaches. Oh my. What do they put on SAT tests to measure this? Does anybody care? How little can a person know about food and still make educated decisions about it? Is this knowledge going to change before they enter the voting booth? Now that’s a scary thought!


Commercial farming as I see it…but a temporary blip until the land is used up, the water polluted, the neighbors nauseated, and the air unbreathable. The farmhouse, the concrete, the machinery, and outbuildings become relics of a bygone vibrancy when another family farm moves to the city financial centers for relief…


Commercial agriculture can survive within pluralistic American society, as we know it – if the farm is rebuilt on some of the values with which it is popularly associated: conservation, independence, self-reliance, family, and community. To sustain itself, commercial agriculture will have to reorganize its social and economic structure as well as its technological base and production methods in a way that reinforces these values…


Alright, I will come down off the soapbox now…it seems a long time between posts lately; but with tomatoes and squash coming out of my ears and our youngest to get off to college, days have seemed too short. As I harvest the vegetables, I can’t help but think about something I read awhile ago. A writing by Masanobu Fukuoka, The One-Straw Revolution. In this he wrote,” If each person were given one quarter-acre, that is 1 1/4 acres to a family of five, that would be more than enough land to support the family for the whole year. If natural farming were practiced, a farmer would also have plenty of time for leisure and social activities within the village community. I think this is the most direct path toward making this country a happy, pleasant land.” I can’t help but agree.

Be well,
Jess

Have you ever…?


Well, I have. I have seen the cutest little cottages – ever.

There is a little community in Oak Bluffs on Martha’s Vineyard; it began as a religious encampment of tents. The Martha’s Vineyard Camp Meeting Association. There are literally hundreds of wonderfully imaginative and cheerfully colored gingerbread cottages. The most extensive collection Carpenter Gothic style architecture in the world. These are truly unique Victorian “gingerbread” cottages. I can only imagine what inspired each owner to decorate and paint their cottage…each one stands out in its own way, truly unique. Being a cottage fanatic to begin with; I was totally enamored with this place.

As much as I adored the fun beautiful colors of these cottages, I can’t see living with it – day in and day out. I have always leaned more toward peaceful calming colors in our little cottage…a sea glass green Venetian plaster in the kitchen, a foggy blue in the living areas…and lots and lots of creamy white. I nice respite from the onslaught of a chaotic world. I have recently added a few touches of reclaimed barn wood, a wall in the living room, a stairway with the treads made from the old barn floors. I have designed a pantry and island incorporating the barn wood as well…now, I have to wait for my husband to have enough time to build them. Poor fella has 41 projects going at once it seems…

I hope you enjoy these cheerful little shelters as much as I did…oh, one of my lil’ front porch :)

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I love being home on my little farm as much as I love to travel, it’s always GREAT to be home.
How do you decorate your little corner of the world?
Jess

Meanwhile, back on the farm…


Wonderful Wednesday…this can only mean it’s time to meet a few more of the animals that call Misty Maples Farm home.
Okay ~ Here we go.

Miss Mercedes.

Lil’ Mum, a sikie; who lays the tiniest of eggs.

Andy, how cute is he?

Lexi, when she was but a pup! mwah.

Sophie, whadjudo? I don’t think you belong in the garden.

Doesn’t this look refreshing!? Okay, now let’s see who we have here…Princess and Mercedes, with Camille’s and Breezy’s rumps.(shhh, don’t tell them I posted this)

Daisy,Jemima, Arnold, and Benjamin ~ yup, they are all girls.

Mercedes,Katdoll, and Camille (the bay colored girl)

The girls, with mostly boys names.

Lexington. Always waiting for someone to play.

KatDoll with Little Andy.

Lexi, Lexi, Lexi…

Uhhhmmm? Lex?

Hope you have a Wonderful Wednesday.
Jess

Did you stay ~ while I was away…


Well, hello there! Welcome to Martha’s Vineyard.

We needed to escape…leave our worries and cares behind. We hopped on a ferry and in just a 45-minutes  from Woods Hole on Cape Cod, the Vineyard with its serene features, pristine sandy beaches, sand dunes and oodles and oodles of natural beauty waited.

Heading out to the other side(southerly) of the Island we left much of the commercial tourist traps behind (though not entirely). A few shops owned by the native people could supply needed trinkets and souvenirs.
Getting there was relatively stress free; an economical, convenient bus service from Oaks Bluffs ~ “Up Island” to the rural community of Aquinnah, formerly known as Gay Head,home to the Wampanoag**.

Once there we found the dramatic, color-streaked Aquinnah Cliffs. Walking along the narrow path of scrub bushes, down to the rocky shore is one of the most beautiful walks you will ever take. If you choose to, you can walk to the right toward the clay cliffs… you will encounter Jungle Beach, clothing optional. (oh, Dear)

Driving back through the winding country roads, many with stone fences and lush vegetation, reminded me of rural Ireland.


The cliffs are cherished by the Wampanoag tribe, who love to tell people about the importance of the cliffs to the tribe, and how they feature prominently in their spirituality and myths.

In 1997, the town changed its name to Aquinnah, which is Wampanoag for “land under the hill.”

MOSHUP TRAIL was completed in 1958 and follows the south shore across the dunes to an exit near the lighthouse. So important is Moshup that the main Aquinnah town road along the shore has been named after him. When Moshup envisioned Europeans coming to his fishing grounds, he is said to have left Aquinnah. He then changed his children into killer whales, turned his pets into stone, and with his wife Squant walked down the beach to disappear behind Zack’s Cliffs. Fog today is attributed to the smoke of Moshup’s peudelee (pipe). Cries heard off the south side during a storm are said to be Squant calling to her lost children.

The Cliffs are ecologically protected, and it is forbidden to climb the cliffs or even touch the clay.

THE AQUINNAH CLIFFS are one hundred and fifty feet of sediment – including red and white clays, green sands, white quartz, black organic soil, and lignite. They tell the story of the past hundred million years one colorful layer at a time.

The streaks of red in the Cliff are from the blood of whales that Moshup would drag onto the Cliffs to cook. The discarded remains from his table are now fossilized deep in the clay. To the Wampanoag, the Aquinnah Cliffs are a sacred spot for the very reason that Moshup chose this special place as his home – they are a watchful place of great bounties.

The ocean is a rare aqua color here, and the waves are quite high.

**The ancestors of Wampanoag people have lived for at least 10,000 years at Aquinnah (Gay Head) and throughout the island of Noepe (Martha’s Vineyard), pursuing a traditional economy based on fishing and agriculture. The Aquinnah Wampanoag share the belief that the giant Moshup created Noepe and the neighboring islands, taught our people how to fish and to catch whales, and still presides over our destinies. Our beliefs and a hundred million years of history are imprinted in the colorful clay cliffs of Aquinnah.


As we boarded the ferry for our ride back to the mainland, a beautiful, bright full move eased out from its cover of clouds…the photo taken without flash, I think gives the best feeling and likeness of the night. We were tired and content.

I hope you are well,
Jess